Hindus demand: L48 trillion reparation

Introduction

Hindus in Malaysia demand 48 trillion pound reparations for their human rights violations by Britain.

The horrendous reports about the attacks on hindu bandhu in Malaysia is a serious issue of violation of human rights. They have demanded reparation from British and have said that they are being treated as second class citizens. It is the responsibility of Hindu India to raise in one voice to support the just case of the hindu in Malaysia. PM and Sonia should call Brit and Malaysian High Commissioners to explain the unconscionable behavior of the Malaysian Government which is reprehensible.

News flash: Nov. 26, 2007 11 am

Hindraf Leaders were discharged from the court today as the Judge was not satisfied with the prosecutors.

Anwar Ibrahim was in court to lend support to the Hindraf leaders.

Hindu lawyers fight for Hindu human rights in Malaysia:

http://www.policewatchmalaysia.com/

Reports on Hindu plight in Malaysia:

http://www.malaysia-today.net/index.shtml

See report in video (aljazeera)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m96FCTKHNA8

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1071126/asp/foreign/story_8592442.asp

Malaysia crushes Indian rally

http://www.jeffooi.com/

http://www.bmahendran.com/ (site jammed?)

http://jelas.info/2007/11/25/hindraf-rally-report/

http://technorati.com/tag/hindraf

http://www.daylife.com/story/0h2yfxe4jN7p0
CNN video http://tinyurl.com/2l2sb5
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=89b_1195977301
More video links at: http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=ll_c14_1195955645
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6s5lKylKMGE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWcEuDPXAfs
Malaysia: demolition of Hindu temples (video) 
See pictures: http://hindustantimes.com/PhotoGallery/Photos_StoryPage.aspx?Category=IndiansprotestinMalaysia

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m96FCTKHNA8&feature=user See video of protests and use of chemical weapons by the Malaysian police.
Protests in pictures at http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_pictures/7111707.stm
Indian protest rocks Malaysia ahead of polls
Reuters
Kuala Lumpur , November 25, 2007
Malaysia ‘s ethnic Indian community staged its biggest anti-government street protest on Sunday when more than 10,000 protesters defied tear gas and water cannon to voice complaints of racial discrimination.
The sheer size of the protest, called by a Hindu rights group, represents a political challenge for the government as it heads toward possible early elections in the next few months.
Ethnic Indians from around the country swarmed into Kuala Lumpur for the rally, despite a virtual lock-down of the capital over the previous three days and warnings from police and the government that people should not take part.
“Malaysian Indians have never gathered in such large numbers in this way…,” said organiser P. Uthaya Kumar, of the Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf).
“They are frustrated and have no job opportunities in the government or the private sector. They are not given business licences or places in university,” he said, adding that Indians were also incensed by some recent demolitions of Hindu temples.
Riot police fired at the protesters with sustained volleys of tear gas and jets of water laced with an eye-stinging chemical, but it took more than five hours to finally clear the streets of downtown Kuala Lumpur, by then littered with empty gas canisters.
Veteran journalists and analysts could not recall a bigger anti-government protest by ethnic Indians, who make up about 7 percent of the population, although some said a larger rally had been held over internal Indian politics in the late 1980s.
Political columnist Zainon Ahmad said the protest would shake the Indian community’s establishment party, the Malaysian Indian Congress (MIC), a junior member of the ruling coalition.
“The MIC is severely challenged on this matter,” he said.
MIC leader S Samy Vellu, who is also works minister, denied the protest spelt trouble for his party. “We represent the Indian community and will remain so,” he said in a statement.
But Vellu, who has himself voiced unease over a recent Hindu temple demolition by local authorities outside the capital, added, “There is still a lot to be done for the Indians and we will continue with our struggle.”
“Lack of opportunities”
Many protesters complained of a lack of educational and business opportunities, saying a government affirmative-action policy in favour of majority ethnic Malays had marginalised them.
Malays make up about 60 percent of the population and, according to official data, remain the poorest group by some average measures such as household income. Opposition groups say the most severe cases of poverty exist among Indians.
Brought over as indentured labour from the late 1800s by colonial ruler Britain, Indians worked Malaya’s rubber estates. These estates were later broken up, forcing many unskilled Indian workers into poverty in the city.
Ostensibly, Sunday’s protesters wanted to hand a petition to the British embassy in support of a legal claim by Hindraf for reparations from Britain for colonial-era abuses. But Hindraf said the protest was also aimed at the Malaysian government.
“We are here for our rights,” one protester told Reuters as he sat cross-legged on the road.
“The British brought our forefathers here 150 years ago,” he added. “Whatever the government is supposed to give us, to look after our welfare, well, they have failed.”
Police fired tear gas outside Kuala Lumpur’s iconic twin towers and five-star hotels. Curious tourists ventured out to take a look but rushed back inside once the gas stung their eyes.
At the Batu Caves, a Hindu place of worship just outside the capital, police clashed with 2,000 protesters early on Sunday after barring entry to the temple.
Many Malaysians, including an Indian Muslim group, opposed the rally, fearing it could spark violence. Malaysia has not experienced a major race riot since 1969, but many seasoned politicians fear racial and religious tensions could flare again.
At least one policeman was injured when protesters hit him with crash helmets, one officer said. Organisers said 400 had been arrested and 19 injured. Police said they had no figures.
It was the second crackdown this month on a demonstration critical of the government, as speculation grows that Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi will call snap elections early next year. The next election is not due until May 2009.
Early in November, about 10,000 protesters demanding electoral reform defied a police ban to rally in the capital.
http://tinyurl.com/23gnj6
Hindraf protesters defiant, about 20,000 showed up in rally
November 25th, 2007 · No Comments
Police roadblocks, police warnings, arrests of top leaders and the prospects of being arrested, fired with tear gas did not deter about 20,000 of Malaysian Indian to show up at a mass rally organized by Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf). The rally was meant to petition the British High Commission for Her Majesty’s support in their bid to sue the British Government for bringing the Indian labours to Malaysia and exploited them for 150 years. Hindraf is seeking a total of RM14 trillion as compensations.
Kuala Lumpur is under siege again today. The rally, which was supposed to be a peaceful gathering as claimed by the organizer, did not get the police permit. The police again showed to the people they meant business. Red trucks, tear gas and chemical-laced water were the order of the day. Unlike the Bersih rally which were unfolding in the midst of heavy downpour, Hindraf protesters had to put up with the tear gas and water cannon without any help from rain, which makes it worse for the women and men who had ignored the police warnings and threats of arrests. It is not known at the time of this writing, how many protesters were injured or arrested, if any.
Attempt to read the latest news updates from Malaysiakini failed as the web-traffic to the independent news portal appears to have gounded to a halt, at least from where I am accessing the site. Access to the news site was extremely slow.
Just two weeks ago, the capital city of Kuala Lumpur witnessed tens of thousands, if not more than 100,000, of people, mostly in yellow, marched to Istana Negara (National Palace) to submit a royal petition seeking help from the King to ensure a free and fair elections in Malaysia. Organized by Bersih, the rally went ahead without police permit and were severely dealt with heavy police presence, scores of arrests, tear gas and water cannon.
Many Malaysians believe their beloved country is transforming into a police-state, if not already one. Peaceful gatrherings and rallies organized by those not in favour of the government were never granted permits by the police and very often than not, dealt with upper hands. Democracy is defintely taking a new shape in Malaysia since the sacking of Anwar almost 10 years ago.
http://www.kualalumpurishome.com/554/hindraf-protesters-defiant-about-20000-showed-up-in-rally/
See: http://www.hindusangam.org.my/
Two things in the morning: Hindraf and fire at Keramat wet market
posted by Hafiz Noor Shams at 9:10 AM on November 25, 2007
I woke to news that tear gas has been fired at crowd again. Unlike the Bersih rally, tear gas seems to have been used more liberally ( via):
Hours before the protest organised by Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf) is due to take place, the police have already begun firing tear gas and chemical-laced water to disperse crowds in three areas in Kuala Lumpur – Jalan Ampang, the KLCC and Batu Caves.
The police fired a volley of tear gas at Jalan Ampang at about 7.40am today to disperse a large crowd who had gathered there. The area has been declared a curfew zone by the police, who have issued a ‘arrest on sight’ order.
Earlier, the police also used tear gas to disperse a crowd which gathered at Batu Caves and the Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC) areas.
Despite roadblocks and a tight police cordon to seal off the city, thousands of Indians from all around the country have arrived in Kuala Lumpur since last night.
Some of the protesters were already at Jalan Ampang near Nikko Hotel – a stone throw away from the British High Commission – early this morning.
Despite repeated firing of chemical-laced water against the 2,000-strong crowd, the protestors appeared defiant and refused to budge.
Police presence is heavy and a few arrests have been made. Part of Jalan Ampang is already closed but protesters continue to filter in from all sides. [ Tear gas fired at defiant protesters. Malaysiakini. November 25 2007]
Also, the Keramat wet market caught fire. Judging from words of mouth, about a quarter of it is gone. I plan to visit the market later today to share some shots with readers, just after I charged up my camera’s cell. It went dead while I went hiking at Bukit Tabur again yesterday.
http://kl.metblogs.com/archives/2007/11/two_things_in_the_morning_hind.phtml
Aliran AGM deplores high-handed police action at Hindraf assembly

Sunday, 25 November 2007

Aliran, at its 31st annual general meeting held in Penang today, has expressed its horror at the heavy-handed way the police responded to the Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf) assembly in Kuala Lumpur this morning.
According to an Al Jazeera correspondent who witnessed events, “police fired water cannons and dozens of rounds of tear gas into the faces of the protesters, turning the demonstration into a street battle.”
Video footage by the station shows the appalling methods employed by the police in dealing with the crowd. The authorities have in effect criminalised the freedom to assemble peacefully – a right guaranteed by the Constitution.  
We are worried that this incident, coming just 15 days after the Bersih assembly to demand electoral reforms, shows that the authorities are displaying absolute disregard for constitutional guarantees. Then, as now, the police used water cannons and tear gas against a peaceful crowd. 
At the Aliran AGM earlier today, P Ramakrishnan was re-elected as president of the social reform group. Also elected were Dr Francis Loh as honorary secretary, Dr Mustafa Kamal Anuar as assistant secretary, and Anil Netto as honorary treasurer.
The new executive committee comprises:
·                                 Dr Prema Devaraj
·                                 Gan Kong Hwee
·                                 Dr Andrew Aeria
·                                 Dr Khoo Boo Teik
·                                 Dr Subramaniam Pillay
·                                 Ong Eu Soon
·                                 Andrew Wong
·                                 Angeline Loh
·                                 Raphael Surin
·                                 Sarajun Hoda Abd Hassan
·                                 Zaharom Nain
R Sivarajah was elected as honorary auditor.
P Ramakrishnan
President
25 November 2007
http://www.aliran.com/content/view/358/11/
Sunday November 25 2007 14:28 IST Report in Tamil Dinamani, Chennai: http://tinyurl.com/2k7r2b

We demand the immediate and unconditional release of Mr. Waytha and his associates

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m96FCTKHNA8&feature=user See video of protests
– Hide quoted text –

8,TODERMAL LANE, BENGALI MARKET, NEW DELHI-110001
                                                                                                           25th November 2007
RT. HON. DATO’
SERI ABDULLAH AHMAD BADAWI
Hon. Prime Minister of Malaysia
Your Highness,
                          The citizens and the Human Rights organisations of India are deeply concerned about violations of Human Rights of the Hindus and other religious minorities in Malaysia who have been marginalized and are destined to remain permanently colonialized .
We are sorry to note that representatives of Hindu community have been denied their fundamental right of peaceful assembly to demand equal rights and considerations from the government of Malaysia at Kuala Lumpur on 25 th Novmber,2007.
We strongly condemn the brutal attack by police authorities on Hindu demonstrators who had gathered to take a petition to the British High Commission at Kuala Lumpur today. We also condemn the    arrest of Human rights activist Mr. P. Waytha Moorthy, Mr. P. Uthayakumar and Mr. V. Ganabatrirau  by the Government of Malaysia.    
We demand the immediate and unconditional release of Mr. Waytha and his associates. We also demand the immediate withdrawal of all the prosecutions and restrictions imposed upon the Human Rights and Hindu activists in Malaysia. 
Rajesh K. Gogna
Convenor

Hindus, police clash in Malaysia
       Story Highlights
       Public transportation into the city was halted
       Protests follow largest demonstration in nearly a decade
       Demonstrators demand equal rights
From Mark Phillips
CNN
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (CNN) — More than 5,000 Hindu protesters met water cannons and tear gas in Malaysia’s capital, Kuala Lumpur, on Sunday while demanding equal rights and consideration from the government.
Despite clashes with police, there were no reports of injuries during the planned protest. Some protesters threw rocks at the water cannon trucks, but others were urging peaceful demonstrations.
Public transportation into the city was stopped, hindering protesters from coming in.
Police stopped protesters as they tried to take a petition to the British High Commission. Talks were under way for authorities to allow six protesters to deliver the petition, should the crowd disperse.
Earlier this month, riot police used water hoses and tear gas against thousands of protesters demanding electoral reform, the largest demonstration in Kuala Lumpur in nearly a decade.
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/11/25/malaysia.protests/index.html
Malaysian police break up rally
Malaysian police have clashed with ethnic Indian protesters in Kuala Lumpur, the country’s capital.
Tear gas and water cannon were used to disperse a crowd of over 5,000 people as they rallied outside the British High Commission.
The protesters are calling for reparations from the UK for sending Indians to Malaysia as indentured labourers a century ago.
The activists also demand measures to improve the living standards of Hindus.
At least 5,000 ethnic Indian men gathered outside Kuala Lumpur’s famous Petronas Towers, carrying Malaysian flags and placards.
Some demonstrators were beaten and bundled into police vans, as tear gas and water cannon were fired into the crowd, according to the Associated Press news agency.
Unfair treatment
Organisers had pledged that the demonstration would be peaceful, but Malaysian authorities nevertheless banned it, fearing that it could inflame racial tensions.
“Indians are treated like third-class citizens”
M. Kulasegaran, Opposition politician

The ostensible aim of the rally was to call on the British government to pay $4 trillion (£2 trillion) in compensation to the two million ethnic Indians in Malaysia whose ancestors were taken to the country as indentured labourers in the 19th century.
But the BBC’s Robin Brant in Kuala Lumpur says the real goal of the demonstrators is to highlight what they see as the unfair treatment of minority Indians in Malaysia.
Ethnic Indians – mainly Hindus – form one of Malaysia’s largest minority groups.
Activists say that many Hindus live in poverty, partly because of policies granting jobs and economic advantages to the ethnic Malay Muslim majority.
“Indians are treated like third-class citizens. The community has been suffering in silence for decades,” said opposition politician M. Kulasegaran.
The government has rejected claims of unfair discrimination.
In advance of the rally, three leading members of the group behind the protest – the Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf) – were arrested.
The three men were later charged with making seditious comments – and could face up to three years in jail if convicted.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7111646.stm
Malaysian police tear gas ethnic Indian rally: witnesses
1 hour ago
KUALA LUMPUR (AFP) — Malaysian police fired tear gas at ethnic Indian protestors rallying here Sunday in support of a multi-trillion dollar lawsuit that blames Britain for their economic problems, witnesses said.
At least 8,000 protestors defied a ban and pushed their way towards the British High Commission (embassy) to deliver a petition despite a heavy security presence and blockade of roads leading to the building.
Police also used water cannons on the crowd who had gathered near the iconic Petronas Twin Towers but the protestors refused to budge while some threw the tear gas canisters back.
Chemicals used in the water cannons cause nausea and force people to gasp for air.
Witnesses said police beat up some protestors with batons. Organisers said at least 400 people were arrested and 19 injured. Police, however, said more than 100 people had been detained.
“Over the last 50 years Indian have been marginalised in this country and we now want the same rights as enjoyed by other communities,” M. Kulasegaran, opposition lawmaker with the Democratic Action Party (DAP), told AFP.
“They have no rights to stop us from protesting today. This is the will of the people,” he said.
The lawsuit targets Britain, Malaysia’s former colonial ruler, and is aimed at highlighting what ethnic Indians here say is continuing discrimination by the Malay-Muslim majority government.
It seeks four trillion dollars’ compensation for the estimated two million ethnic Indians whose ancestors were brought here as indentured labourers by Britain in the 1800s — two million dollars each.
The gathering is organised by the Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf).
The activists are also demanding the government boost the social and economic standards of minority Hindus, who make up the third largest community in Malaysia.
After six hours of confrontations, police allowed Hindraf to submit the petition but the offer was rejected.
P. Uthayakumar, Hindraf’s legal adviser, said the petition would be delivered to Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II in London. The crowd then dispersed following pleas from organisers.
The petition asks for Britain to appoint a lawyer to represent them in their case.
Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz, minister in the prime minister’s department, backed police use of force.
“This protest is illegal. The police have been given permission to use legitimate means to halt the gathering. And this means the use of tear gas and water cannons,” he told AFP.
Lim Kit Siang, opposition lawmaker and chairman of the DAP, said the excessive use of police force “is most high-handed, ham-fisted and undemocratic.”
The government had banned the rally, fearing it could spark racial violence and warned that anyone who participated would be detained.
Demonstrators condemned the tough police action and said that they would not be not silenced.
N. Vijayan, 40, an engineer, said the Indian community had been marginalised for too long.
“This demonstration should be a wake-up call for the government that we are really upset with its policies,” he said.
Ethnic Indians, mainly Tamils, account for eight percent of Malaysia’s population. A large proportion lack skills, money and education.
Forming 60 percent of the nation’s 27 million people, ethnic Malay Muslims make up the majority group, while 26 percent are Chinese.
Malaysia won its independence from Britain 50 years ago.
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5ghlmMmVSzOBxkHbZh5sJYL0kdODA
Indian protest rocks Malaysia ahead of polls
Sun Nov 25, 2007 2:52am EST
By Mark Bendeich and Clarence Fernandez
KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) – Malaysia’s ethnic Indian community staged its biggest anti-government street protest on Sunday when more than 10,000 protesters defied tear gas and water cannon to voice complaints of racial discrimination.
The sheer size of the protest, called by a Hindu rights group, represents a political challenge for the government as it heads toward possible early elections in the next few months.
Ethnic Indians from around the country swarmed into Kuala Lumpur for the rally, despite a virtual lock-down of the capital over the previous three days and warnings from police and the government that people should not take part.
“Malaysian Indians have never gathered in such large numbers in this way…,” said organizer P. Uthaya Kumar, of the Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf).
“They are frustrated and have no job opportunities in the government or the private sector. They are not given business licenses or places in university,” he said, adding that Indians were also incensed by some recent demolitions of Hindu temples.
Riot police fired at the protesters with sustained volleys of tear gas and jets of water laced with an eye-stinging chemical, but it took more than five hours to finally clear the streets of downtown Kuala Lumpur, by then littered with empty gas canisters.
Veteran journalists and analysts could not recall a bigger anti-government protest by ethnic Indians, who make up about 7 percent of the population, although some said a larger rally had been held over internal Indian politics in the late 1980s.
Political columnist Zainon Ahmad said the protest would shake the Indian community’s establishment party, the Malaysian Indian Congress (MIC), a junior member of the ruling coalition.
“The MIC is severely challenged on this matter,” he said.
MIC leader S. Samy Vellu, who is also works minister, denied the protest spelt trouble for his party. “We represent the Indian community and will remain so,” he said in a statement.
But Vellu, who has himself voiced unease over a recent Hindu temple demolition by local authorities outside the capital, added: “There is still a lot to be done for the Indians and we will continue with our struggle.”
“LACK OF OPPORTUNITIES”
Many protesters complained of a lack of educational and business opportunities, saying a government affirmative-action policy in favor of majority ethnic Malays had marginalized them.
Malays make up about 60 percent of the population and, according to official data, remain the poorest group by some average measures such as household income. Opposition groups say the most severe cases of poverty exist among Indians.
Brought over as indentured labor from the late 1800s by colonial ruler Britain, Indians worked Malaya’s rubber estates. These estates were later broken up, forcing many unskilled Indian workers into poverty in the city.
Ostensibly, Sunday’s protesters wanted to hand a petition to the British embassy in support of a legal claim by Hindraf for reparations from Britain for colonial-era abuses. But Hindraf said the protest was also aimed at the Malaysian government.
“We are here for our rights,” one protester told Reuters as he sat cross-legged on the road.
“The British brought our forefathers here 150 years ago,” he added. “Whatever the government is supposed to give us, to look after our welfare, well, they have failed.”
Police fired tear gas outside Kuala Lumpur’s iconic twin towers and five-star hotels. Curious tourists ventured out to take a look but rushed back inside once the gas stung their eyes.
At the Batu Caves, a Hindu place of worship just outside the capital, police clashed with 2,000 protesters early on Sunday after barring entry to the temple.
Many Malaysians, including an Indian Muslim group, opposed the rally, fearing it could spark violence. Malaysia has not experienced a major race riot since 1969, but many seasoned politicians fear racial and religious tensions could flare again.
At least one policeman was injured when protesters hit him with crash helmets, one officer said. Organizers said 400 had been arrested and 19 injured. Police said they had no figures.
It was the second crackdown this month on a demonstration critical of the government, as speculation grows that Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi will call snap elections early next year. The next election is not due until May 2009.
Early in November, about 10,000 protesters demanding electoral reform defied a police ban to rally in the capital.
(Additional reporting by Mark Bendeich, Jalil Hamid, Naveen Thukral and Liau Y-Sing; editing by Roger Crabb)
http://www.reuters.com/article/newsMaps/idUSKLR16504820071125
Crackdown on ethnic Indian community’s protest march in Malaysia
November 25th, 2007 – 1:53 pm ICT by admin
Kula Lumpur, Nov 25 (ANI): A protest march by ethnic Indian community in Malaysia had to face severe police action as tear gas shells and water laced with chemicals were shot at them.
The ethnic Indians, who are a minority here, were protesting against the discrimination faced by them by the government in areas like employment and business opportunities.
There were around 4,000 protestors who were shouting anti-government slogans on Sunday.
Ethnic Indian minorities were banned from holding the protest march by the government, which cited that the demonstration could lead to racial unrest.
This is second time in a month when authorities here have launched a crackdown on Indian community, who constitutes close to seven percent of Malaysia’s total population. (ANI) http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/south-asia/crackdown-on-ethnic-indian-communitys-protest-march-in-malaysia_1006540.html
Police fire tear gas on ethnic Indian protesters in Malaysia
Sunday November 25 2007 09:34 IST
PTI
KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysian police on Sunday fired tear gas and water cannon to prevent thousands of ethnic Indians from taking part in a rally, declared “illegal” by the government, outside the British High Commission here.

The demonstrators, who had gathered outside the Petronas Twin Towers, the second largest building in the world, were beaten and dragged into trucks by the police, witnesses said.

The rally call had been given by Hindu Rights Action Force (HINDRAF), a non governmental agency, which has held the British government responsible for bringing Indians to the then Malaya as “indentured laborers” and exploiting them”.

It has claimed a compensation of four trillion US dollars. Thousands of ethnic Indians, a few carrying photos of Mahatma Gandhi had assembled before dawn near the Petronas Towers.

Several hundreds more had gathered in Batu Caves, a limestone cave Murugan Temple on the city’s outskirts.

The government had warned of stiff action if the protesters went ahead with their plans to assemble before the British High Commission at Jalan Ampang here to present a memorandum signed by over 100,000 ethnic Indians.

Malaysian Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi on Saturday said street demonstrations were not the way for people to voice their grouses.

“We are not a nation where the people cannot voice their grievances, but it has to be done in the proper way. We have elections…They can contest, they can campaign, ask for votes,” the premier said in Kampala.

The rally was the second such street protest in Kuala Lumpur this month. The last protest was on November 10 where thousands of people gathered to demand electoral reforms.

Street demonstrations are extremely rare in multi-ethnic Malaysia.

http://tinyurl.com/2cfknt

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One Response to “Hindus demand: L48 trillion reparation”

  1. RantCushion Says:

    […] with batons and unleashed gas and chemical-laced water. The rally was officially in support of a multi-trillion dollar lawsuit accusing former colonial ruler Britain of being at the root of Indians’ economic problems by […]

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